The problem with running a team at full capacity

I shared this earlier on LinkedIn, but thought that it was worth sharing it here too as a reminder to myself: Six Myths of Product Development

I came across the article above while researching why a team that traditionally does great work may sometimes stumble (yes, mine). The past few weeks had been a whirlwind of activity, with team output close to or at an all time high. We were publishing and developing things left and right, and everyone was running close to capacity. It was great.

Then came an e-mail that questioned the quality of the output. Then another. Much of the great work threatened to come undone, but thankfully most made it through unscathed. We were still, generally, in a good place. But this was a wake up call. Something needed to be done.

After I explained to her my conundrum, my knowledgeable friend, Google, suggested an article from the Harvard Business Review website called “Six Myths of Product Development.”

It was a most excellent suggestion.

The article highlighted six myths or fallacies:

  1. High utilization of resources will improve performance.
  2. Processing work in large batches improves the economics of the development process.
  3. Our development plan is great; we just need to stick to it.
  4. The sooner the project is started, the sooner it will be finished.
  5. The more features we put into a product, the more customers will like it.
  6. We will be more successful if we get it right the first time.

It didn’t take long for me to realise that our problem was very likely linked to #1: I’d neglected slack.

You see, I normally tend guard slack time jealously as I know time-pressures are often a big cause of low quality output. But given the myriad of “urgent” business needs had allowed myself and the team to run too close to full capacity.

We have seen that projects’ speed, efficiency, and output quality inevitably decrease when managers completely fill the plates of their product-development employees—no matter how skilled those managers may be. High utilization has serious negative side effects… Add 5% more work, and completing it may take 100% longer. But few people understand this effect.

It’s funny how bringing down the amount of expected output may actually increase it.

(As an aside, I love point #6 – I’m a big fan of “fail fast, fail often” as I believe strongly in “the wisdom of crowds”, where we can aggregate feedback and iterate quickly, especially for early development. But it’s not always easy to get business buy-in, especially when all they see in “fail fast, fail often” is “fail”!)

 

What are you doing to help the person next to you?

Was taking a break from my studies (exams next week, people!), having my dinner and watching some YouTube vids on “leadership” (just because) when I came across Simon Sinek and this video.

Reminded me of something I knew very well sometime back, but forgotten in the hustle and bustle of corporate life: that we sometimes have to put ourselves aside, ignoring the modern social beat of “I, I, me, me“, and think about how we can help and serve others, not in the hope for some future karmic gain, but because we can.

Developing a Culture

Seth Godin wrote a wonderful post on how we sometimes need an external push (through laws, policies, cultural guardrails) to do what’s best for us. It can be basically summed up by the following statements (from the post):

  • We know that wearing a bicycle helmet can save us from years in the hospital, but some people feel awkward being the only one in a group to do so. A helmet law, then, takes away that problem and we come out ahead.
  • Guard rails always seem like an unwanted intrusion on personal freedom. Until we get used to them. Then we wonder how we lived without them.

I was just thinking about true this is for so many other aspects of our lives. The friends we choose, because of the context they set, determine many of the decisions we make, and consequently many of the paths of life we take.

When setting up a company, a department, a team – how important it would be then to make sure that the cultural norms we encourage and enforce are the ones we want.

Whether it’s a culture of success (however you define it); freedom of experimentation; openness of communication; risk taking; or hard work, it is our job as servant leaders to ensure that it’s the least awkward thing to do.