Category Archives: Tech

Business vs. IT

I felt like a lawyer. The call was in less than 12 hours, and I was busy preparing my case, consolidating evidence and building my story. To be honest, I wasn’t 100% behind the argument I was preparing to put across, but I didn’t really have much of a choice. I had to believe — how could I convince others if I couldn’t even convince myself?

But at the same time, I really wanted to steer clear on the “us vs. them”. Together with allies “from the other side”, we were working hard on framing it from a collaborative angle. It’d do us all no good if our discussion disintegrated into a blame game.

The situation at hand was a classic business vs. IT situation. Business says “we asked for this”, and IT says “no, you didn’t.” Whatever the case, the project deadlines weren’t going to be hit and nobody wanted to be responsible.

The funny thing is, if you asked me, I’d say no one was responsible (or that we all were). It was one of the first times we were doing anything close to what we were doing, and it was almost expected that hiccups like these were going to occur.

Requirements were defined, and IT made good on those requirements. Business was as clear as they could be on those requirements, but apparently not clear enough.  But how could they be? The project was a little too big and too fuzzy to be executed perfectly from the get-go.

Maybe a more iterative approach might have worked better, with all parties agreeing at the start that for a period of say, two or three weeks, we’d all be in a transition phase, where 70% of the requirements were met and the other 30% part of some type of agile-development, exploratory process, where things didn’t need to work perfectly but problems rectified quickly.

True, we could have spent more time thinking through and defining better requirements. But even if we spent an additional year we might not have uncovered requirements buried deep under others, the discovery of which were dependent on the implementation of the others. Would the need for a parachute have come to pass if planes hadn’t yet been invented? Would these later requirements have come to pass if the earlier ones hadn’t been implemented?

Whatever the case, this was an interesting situation to be in.

On Nerdiness, Programming, and Cooking

The extent of my nerdiness was only realized this after reading the following excerpt from the book “Decisive” by Chip Heath (I find it a really good book, by the way):

In our quest to convince you of the merits of a process, we realize we’ve been facing an uphill battle: It would be hard to find a less inspiring word in the English language than “process.” It’s like trying to get people giddy about an algorithm.

…and vehemently disagreeing with it. Because I’m inspired by process (and systems; and the like), and get giddy playing with algorithms!

Programming and Cooking

I can hardly fathom  a more exciting afternoon than one in which after hours of programming, scripting, and coding that seem to be going nowhere, with the swish of a “compile and run” magic is revealed: the completed program; website; or basic scripting routine, coming together and working like a charm.

For non-programmers who are looking and longing for a similar experience, I say look no further than your kitchen. In cooking, a similar joy can be found. Many times I’ve found myself in the kitchen preparing dishes that look nothing like what they started with.

One of my favourite “how can this be that?!” revelations can be found in one of my favourite Chinese dishes called hor fun

Especially if it’s the first time you’re trying to cook it, almost all the way through to the last couple of steps where you pour in the cornstarch solution and the egg, you’d be questioning if it’s really going to be turn out like you think it should turn out to be (before that, the dish just resembles a really sad attempt at kway teow soup).

I find it a great analog to programming. Where you start off with various ingredients that don’t appear to mix together too well, and where you’re trudging through tough periods based on nothing but faith and the hope that it’s going to work out in the end.

It’s no wonder that many computer and programming books come with titles like “Recipes” and “Cookbook”.

Creating on the iPad

Creating on the iPad… it’s just not the same as creating on the computer.

When on the iPad, I’m far more a consumer. Typing is laboured, and sharing isn’t as easy. If I see an image on Facebook or Linked In, and I want to share that with my Google+ followers, it’s not straightforward at all.

Consumption, though, is far easier. I read a lot on the iPad (it’s essentially replaced my weekly visits to the library); viewing images are a joy (whoever invented pinch-to-zoom should be knighted); and browsing through music on the Spotify app is quite the adventure.

The funny thing is that all this consumption without sharing irks me. Every time I experience something I like, I want to share that with somebody. Everybody. But because of the difficulty, I park it in my mind. I bookmark it. Tell myself, “I’ll share that later,” knowing full well it probably isn’t going to happen.

A look through my iBooks app shows pages upon pages of highlighted material and notes, all of which during the time of highlighting and noting was something I was just dying to share, but which I haven’t.

That’s why I’m bitching about it here, typing this on my MacBook Pro, with my iPad’s Spotify app providing beautiful background music.

How the iPad has changed my reading habits, and how it hasn’t

For my birthday this year, my wife gave me an iPad Air (thank you!) Unbeknownst to me, this was to radically change my reading habits.

I am–perhaps was, now with the iPad–huge fan of libraries and bookstores: the smell of age-worn books, newspapers and old people; the sounds of teenagers and their gossipy tongues; and the pitter-patter thumping of little feet on carpeted wooden floors. Oh, and I suppose, the books themselves.

Ever since I got the iPad though, and downloaded both the iBooks and Kindle apps, I haven’t experienced the pull the libraries and bookstores used to have on me. Almost all my reading has been done on the iPad these past couple of weeks I’ve had it, and the only reason I got to bookstores is to get ideas on what book I should digitally procure next.

But one thing that I’ve noticed is that reading books on the iPad provides a slightly different experience. For some reason, it doesn’t gel with reading for pure fun or enjoyment.

 

I’ve had great success in moving most of my reading toward the iPad for non-fiction, business- and psychology-type books, but less so for the more fictional, narrative, or biographical- and travel-type books. On the former, what I’ve especially liked is the fact that I could highlight and add notes at will, adding a whole different dimension to my reading.

For some reason, when I’m on the iPad my mind races toward what I hope to get out of the book, as opposed to enjoying the book for what it is.

Metro Design

WordPress 3.8 has just been released, and it brings with it some rather significant aesthetic changes to the admin interface. While giving it a test drive, I realised how closely it resembled that of Windows Phone/8 (in terms of colours, fonts, and distinctive “flatness”).

For all their faults, Microsoft’s Metro interface is, to me at least, a pretty decent design philosophy. And if it wasn’t for the fact of having felt like a second-class citizen in terms of mobile app development while holding on to an Android device (it’s almost always iOS first), and not quite wanting to push myself further down the ranks, I’d have gotten a Windows Phone purely on the UI (user interface) itself.

It’s my guess that if there’s going to be a Web 3.0 interface, my feeling is that it’s going to be Metro (if it hasn’t happened already).